MS Curriculum

Coursework

During the early stages of their doctoral training, students gain a fundamental understanding of the principles of pharmacology, acquired through classroom-based instruction.

Completion of course work ordinarily requires one year. The following are sample plans of courses a master's student might take in their time here.

Plan A

20 major credits + 10 thesis credits
Final exam is written and oral

Year 1

Fall

  • PHCL 5109 - Problems in Pharmacology (4 credits)
  • PHCL 5110 - Introduction to Pharmacology (3 credits)
  • PHCL 5112 - A Graduate Toolkit I: An introduction to the scientific research lab (1 credit)
  • PHCL 8100 - Laboratory Research in Pharmacology (4 credits)
  • PHCL 8200 - Seminar: Selected Topics in Pharmacology (1 credit)

Spring

  • PHCL 8100 - Laboratory Research in Pharmacology (4 credits)
  • PHCL 8211 - Advanced Medical Pharmacology I (5 credits)
  • PHCL 8777 - Thesis Credits: Master's (5 credits)

Summer

  • PHCL 8221 - Advanced Medical Pharmacology II (3 credits)
  • PHCL 8777 - Thesis Credits: Master's (5 credits)

Year 2

Fall

  • PHCL 8333 (1 credit)

Spring

  • PHCL 8333 (1 credit)

Plan B

30 major credits
Capstone Project Required

Fall

  • PHCL 5109 - Problems in Pharmacology (4 credits)
  • PHCL 5110 - Introduction to Pharmacology (3 credits)
  • PHCL 5112 - A Graduate Toolkit I: An introduction to the scientific research lab (1 credit)
  • PHCL 8100 - Laboratory Research in Pharmacology (4 credits)
  • PHCL 8200 - Seminar: Selected Topics in Pharmacology (1 credit)

Spring

  • PHCL 5109 - Problems in Pharmacology (4 credits)
  • PHCL 8100 - Laboratory Research in Pharmacology (4 credits)
  • PHCL 8211 - Advanced Medical Pharmacology I (5 credits)
  • Submit Graduate Degree Plan (OTR198)

Summer

  • PHCL 5109 - Problems in Pharmacology (1 credit)
  • PHCL 8212 - Advanced Medical Pharmacology II (3 credits)

Advising and lab rotations

Master's Students choose their advisors shortly after beginning their first year.

Student seminars

As well as the ability to generate data, scientists must also be able to communicate these results to others. Therefore, our students learn to prepare and present research seminars. In addition, each of our students, as part of their M.S. qualifying examination, prepares and defends a research proposal.

Minor and supporting programs

Students majoring in pharmacology usually select a minor in biochemistry, neuroscience, physiology, or psychology. Alternatively, a student can select a supporting program in lieu of a minor. This consists of courses from two or more disciplines relevant to the student's doctoral research.