PhD Curriculum

Curriculum

Ph.D. Curriculum is as follows:

Year 1

Fall

  • PHCL 5110 - Introduction to Pharmacology (3 credits)
  • PHCL 5112 - A Graduate Toolkit I: An introduction to the scientific research lab (1 credit)
  • PHCL 8100 - Laboratory Research in Pharmacology (4 credits)
  • PHCL 8200 - Seminar: Selected Topics in Pharmacology (1 credit)
  • Lab Rotations 1 & 2 
  • Submit form PHCL-1

Spring

  • PHCL 8100 - Laboratory Research in Pharmacology (4 credits)
  • PHCL 8211 - Advanced Medical Pharmacology I (5 credits)
  • Lab Rotation 3
  • Submit form PHCL-1

Summer

  • PHCL 8212 - Advanced Medical Pharmacology II (3 credits)
  • PHCL 8888 - Thesis Credits: Doctoral (11 credits)

Year 2

Fall

  • PHCL 5113 - Graduate Student Toolkit II: Scientific speaking and writing for graduate students (2 credits)
  • PHCL 8200 - Seminar: Selected Topics in Pharmacology (1 credit)
  • PHCL 8888 - Thesis Credits: Doctoral (4 credits)
  • Preliminary Written Examination
  • Written Proposal Deadline - January 1

Spring

  • PHCL 8888 - Thesis Credits: Doctoral (9 credits) 
  • Submit Graduate Degree Plan (OTR198)
  • Complete Assign/Update
  • Preliminary Oral Examining Committee (Online)

Summer

  • Preliminary Oral Examination Scheduling (Online)

Year 3

Fall

  • PHCL 8444 (1 credit)
  • Submit form OTR 195 if not on training grant

Spring

  • PHCL 8444 (1 credit)
  • Submit form OTR195 if not on training grant

Summer

  • PHCL 8444 (1 credit)
  • Submit form OTR 195 if not on training grant

Year 4

Fall

  • PHCL 8444 (1 credit)
  • Submit form OTR195 if not on training grant

Spring

  • PHCL 8444 (1 credit)
  • Submit form OTR 195 if not on training grant

Summer

  • PHCL 8444 (1 credit)
  • Submit form OTR 195 if not on training grant
  • Annual meeting with thesis committee - submit report to DGS
  • Request a Graduate Packet from Graduate School

Year 5+

Each Semester

  • PHCL 8444 (1 Credit)
  • Submit form OTR 195 if not on training Grant

To Graduate

  • By first workign day of the intended month of graduation submit Reviewers Report (GS 2)
  • Schedule Final Oral Examination (online)
  • Submit Final Oral Examination Report Form (GS19)

Advising and lab rotations

Year 1

The Director of Graduate Studies serves as the adviser to first-year students in the program. During their first year, most students rotate through three laboratories within the department. The purpose of these 8 week rotations is two-fold; first to permit the student to acquire practical experience in several different pharmacology laboratories and second, to assist the student in choosing a Ph.D. adviser, in whose laboratory the student will spend the bulk of his/her graduate training.

Year 2+

Under the guidance of the Ph.D. adviser they have chosen, students acquire skills necessary to conduct original research. They learn how to carefully read and critically evaluate scientific literature, to conceive and carry out experiments designed to test a defined hypothesis, and to critically interpret data obtained from these efforts.

Examinations

Written exam - by June 1, Year 2

A written examination in pharmacology is taken before the preliminary oral examination. It consists of a thesis proposal written in the manner of a research grant proposal.

Preliminary oral exam

A preliminary oral examination is designed to test the student's ability to apply principles of both pharmacology and the chosen minor area to specific research questions.

Final oral exam - Thesis defense

A final oral examination consists of defense of the candidate's thesis.

Student seminars and publications

As well as the ability to generate data, scientists must also be able to communicate these results to others. Therefore, our students learn to prepare and present research seminars. In addition, each of our students, as part of their Ph.D. qualifying examination, prepares and defends a research proposal. During their graduate studies, all students co-author (usually as first author) at least one research paper submitted for publication. In recent years, graduating students have published an average of four papers in peer-reviewed journals.

Minor and supporting programs

Students majoring in pharmacology usually select a minor in biochemistry, neuroscience, physiology, or psychology. Alternatively, a student can select a supporting program in lieu of a minor. This consists of courses from two or more disciplines relevant to the student's doctoral research.